Upstate4x4.com

Full Version: Snow Wheeling Thread
You're currently viewing a stripped down version of our content. View the full version with proper formatting.
Pages: 1 2 3 4 5
Skinny tires don't do so well for snow wheeling. Do good on snowy highways, though.
(11-18-2013 12:38 PM)Dmiller Wrote: [ -> ]Clothier is the reason I started winter wheeling in the first place. He also builds the best chains on the northeast....and probably in the entire US. It also so happens that he lives in NY about 15 miles from me lol. His site is clotheir traction and he builds chains from 31s up to 54s I believe. After seeing the comparison first hand I wouldnt buy chains from anyone else..ever.

Those do look nice. More cross chains than the ones I have for the scout. I want a set for the Suburban, will have to look him up when I'm ready.
When it comes to snow, the best thing I have seen in the snow is light vehicles with wide tires. Samurais and wranglers seem to go all over the place when they run the wide tread and low air. (Skinny tires on the vehicles do not, and seems to have a much worse effect due to their lightness)

As far as purchasing chains, it always seems like that's the very last thing people are interested in. There is a million of other things on the "to-do" list, so of course, with the price of chains are also added onto this, its very rare to see people actually running them.

A good front and rear locker would probably compare very closely to buying 4 chains price wise. (depending on the tire size), and lockers are used on the fly and all season.... chains are in the winter, and when you pull off the road and throw them on. BUT, lockers do not compare to chains when it comes to this type of area due to the type of weather, snow, and ice.

So, I guess it depends on what type of wheeling you do.... If was personally building on the "cheap" and did mainly snow runs and camping... I would buy a set of old used practically bald 35's and Just buy some good chains. Your vehicle would go farther than any other rig without chains no matter how much $$$ they have into their rig.

Right now, I am currently worried about running chains. I am fully locked with 'fuzzy' lockers and being able to spin a tire around a corner is actually fundamental to my set up. Chains have so much grip that I am worried about breaking an axle shaft or destroying the pin/spiders. For those of you who have open diffs or auto lockers, it will be much less of a fear.

However, I did run some old semi chains to see how it was. Of course, these are met for a skinny tire, so it would only be a matter of time before they walk off..... the biggest thing with chains is side wall coverage, without that, they WILL walk off on you....and that's a real PITA on the trail.

This was last winter...

[Image: PC232030.jpg]

[Image: PC232028.jpg]

[Image: PC232026.jpg]

This is a picture of another friend who used chains last year. He had 37" hummer tires (I believe) which are known to have a stiffer wall and harder rubber, yet with chains...he was the leader all day long!


[Image: P1052151.jpg]
Dmiller, why couldn't you tie the semi chains from side to side across the wheel? Kinda like the set up on the Jeep?
(11-19-2013 06:02 PM)Dmiller Wrote: [ -> ]When it comes to snow, the best thing I have seen in the snow is light vehicles with wide tires. Samurais and wranglers seem to go all over the place when they run the wide tread and low air. (Skinny tires on the vehicles do not, and seems to have a much worse effect due to their lightness)

As far as purchasing chains, it always seems like that's the very last thing people are interested in. There is a million of other things on the "to-do" list, so of course, with the price of chains are also added onto this, its very rare to see people actually running them.

A good front and rear locker would probably compare very closely to buying 4 chains price wise. (depending on the tire size), and lockers are used on the fly and all season.... chains are in the winter, and when you pull off the road and throw them on. BUT, lockers do not compare to chains when it comes to this type of area due to the type of weather, snow, and ice.

So, I guess it depends on what type of wheeling you do.... If was personally building on the "cheap" and did mainly snow runs and camping... I would buy a set of old used practically bald 35's and Just buy some good chains. Your vehicle would go farther than any other rig without chains no matter how much $$$ they have into their rig.

Right now, I am currently worried about running chains. I am fully locked with 'fuzzy' lockers and being able to spin a tire around a corner is actually fundamental to my set up. Chains have so much grip that I am worried about breaking an axle shaft or destroying the pin/spiders. For those of you who have open diffs or auto lockers, it will be much less of a fear.

However, I did run some old semi chains to see how it was. Of course, these are met for a skinny tire, so it would only be a matter of time before they walk off..... the biggest thing with chains is side wall coverage, without that, they WILL walk off on you....and that's a real PITA on the trail.

This was last winter...

[Image: PC232030.jpg]

[Image: PC232028.jpg]

[Image: PC232026.jpg]

This is a picture of another friend who used chains last year. He had 37" hummer tires (I believe) which are known to have a stiffer wall and harder rubber, yet with chains...he was the leader all day long!


[Image: P1052151.jpg]

I had a video (my phone has since died) of that TJ trying to pull a jeep out of a ditch on last year's cnyjeep snowbowl.

Those tires don't seem to do so well on hard packed snow and ice.

Someone planted a JK Rubicon in a ditch trying to turn around.
With or with out chains?

(11-20-2013 12:11 AM)Capria Wrote: [ -> ]Dmiller, why couldn't you tie the semi chains from side to side across the wheel? Kinda like the set up on the Jeep?

Bungies don't hold up. Trees, ice, and even ruts rip them off. Even cam lock styles tend to loosen up. And the problem with that is If it goes unnoticed.....they'll rap around your axle and then your bummin hard trying to get them unknotted. Not saying bungies won't work....but its very unreliable.. The best thing to do is make sets that fit really snug on the tire with a deep sidewall. They won't loosen and they won't come off unless they break.
I was more meaning cable or chain. There's a few companies that have a set up like that.
I don't know. I believe the inside of the wheel would give me the most trouble....since it doesn't go down the sidewall far enough, even with the outer cabled/chained, the diameter of the chain ring is too similar to the diameter of the actual tire.

They do have some pretty funky stuff out there though...a lot of unusual combinations, I imagine for the 'ease' of putting them on a vehicle. There isn't just one right ways to do things either, so I bet there are still a lot of different wheel chain combinations that would work for hardcore off road use. Skid steer chains have some pretty unique designs as well.

It would be interesting to see people experimenting with them more.
This past weekend ride was a good welcoming to the new winter wheeling season.... A few things happened that is a direct responsibility to the colder weather, and gives me some good material to discuss!

*For those who showed up, thank you, it was a short, but good time, and I hope to see you guys soon.

One of the areas discussed was self preparation, having the right amount of clothes, again, this is a BIG must. This weekend we ended up walking out of the woods (about 1/2 mile or so) with temps around 20 degrees and wind chill of 10 degrees... You learn very quickly what is keeping you warm and what is not. I would recommend dressing up in all of your winter attire and taking a 20-30 minute walk through the snow, you will learn quickly what's working and what's not working. I personally know now which new garments I will be changing out this winter and what areas I will need additional layers. Sadly, I learned this on the walk of shame out of the woods.

Second, the whole partner vehicle thing definitely helps. We ended up going back into the woods to hit the main trail because everyone left early. We would have made it out, but ended up loosing all brakes and sliding down off a hill, wedged on a tree. This shit happens all of the time, just when you think you have all of your bases covered, something brakes! But you must be prepared for it. We had a friend nearby that would help us if we had troubles, but we were close enough to the truck to take the walk.


Here are some pictures of the Cherokee the next day for the rescue...(my father brought is CJ-7 down to pull the Cherokee back on its feet again)

[Image: PB240269.jpg]
[Image: PB240272.jpg]

And, if you can tell by these pictures... these steep hills are nothing to mess around with! We've had two other vehicles stuck near this same ledge from the past few winters of wheeling at this location...

Another thing to note when you plan on leaving your vehicle over night, unplug the battery! For some reason, every vehicle we've come back to rescue over night during winter season has a dead battery..... it never fails... Also remember, never leave a dead battery in below freezing tempts, it will destroy it.

[Image: PB240274.jpg]

This one was dead, but not sure if it was toast yet. The other common problem is a wet starter freezing, which this one had as well.. took a new battery and some banging on the starter to get her to crank over.


Anyway, here's some pictures of the damage...

[Image: PB240289.jpg]
[Image: PB240282.jpg]
Never thought about parts like the starter freezing up on you. Good info. Being from AZ warm cloths are a must even when going to the store for me lol.
Pages: 1 2 3 4 5
Reference URL's